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LGBTQ+ Dancers You Should Check Out

Posted by Aurora Intern on
LGBTQ+ Dancers You Should Check Out

June is the most colorful month of the year- Pride Month! At Aurora Tights, we are here to celebrate everyone. The dancing community has a place for everyone and these performers offer representation to queer audiences. Anyone can be involved in dance and be accepted unconditionally regardless on how they identify. When you dance, you are communicating with the audience, yourself and your fellow dancers. Varying perspectives are needed in dancing in order for representation to be fully fledged out. You will want to keep up with these LGBTQ+ dancers long after pride month ends.

 

 

1) Harper Watters is a gay black ballet dancer.  He is a soloist from the Houston Ballet.  He has a YouTube channel called The Harper Watters where he chronicles the behind the scenes of his dance schedule and what its like being a viral star.

 

2) Jin Xing- Jin Xing is a Chinese ballet and modern dancer, choreographer and actress. She is even the founder and artistic director of her own dance company Shanghai. She is a transgender woman. 

3) Chase Johnsey- Chase Johnsey is a genderfluid dancer. Chase is the first out genderfluid dancer to join an all female dance ensemble at a ballet company. 

 

4) Navtej Singh Johar is a Bharatanatyam dancer and choreographer.  Bharatanatyam is one of the oldest classical dance traditions. Navtej is also a gay activist. He was part of a landmark case in 2016. It was a case that decriminalized homosexuality in the Indian Supreme Court.

 

5) Lennon Torres- Lennon Torres is from the reality show hit Dance Moms. She has her own media company Continuum. Continuum focuses on educating people on ensuring inclusivity in multiple spaces. Her discussion of inclusivity often center on dance studios. She has called for dance teachers to stop categorizing movements as for girls only or for boys only. It puts dance in binary and restrictive categories. Consequently, those categories make people who don't fit into that box feel uncomfortable.

 

In conclusion, all of these people deserve to be seen fully. They represent the LGBTQ+ to the fullest. They represent marginalized community that deserve to be recognized for their talent and living in their truth. 

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